Diverse #LoveOzYA Recommendations

I think most people in the world are under the impression that Australia is very White and very unforgiving to minorities. I mean, who can blame them right? We are known, amongst our white sandy beaches and iconic landmarks, as a country of racists – a fact that many people try to perpetuate instead of deny. Our media constantly erases most everyone that doesn’t have the trademark sun-kissed skin (God forbid you were actually born brown) and we nationally celebrate the day that our country was officially stolen from its Indigenous population. We still haven’t passed laws allowing same-sex marriage, we treat asylum seekers like criminals and we have so much conscious and unconscious bias, it’s kind of ridiculous. And worst of all, we are so complacent in letting it all happen.

My parents are migrants and Australia has provided us all a better life and for that, I will forever be thankful to the country that I will always call home. Saying this, the complete and utter lack of empathy for minorities, especially for Indigenous communities on Australia Day, is something I will never proud of. However, I’m ever the optimist, and so one thing I will be celebrating today is the efforts of the Australian publishing industry to get diverse books into teen hands. Yes, we still have a far way to go. But considering the lack of diversity in YA as a whole, I think we are doing pretty well so far. Whilst some of the books below are still on my TBR (which will be rectified very soon, I promise), some are ones that I have already read and greatly enjoyed – I hope this list is helpful and you find some good books because of it!

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Book Review: Caraval

Caraval (Untitled, #1)
Caraval
by Stephanie Garber

Series: Book 1 (Untitled Series)

Genre: YA Romance, Fantasy

Publisher: Hachette Australia


AMAZON // BOOK DEPOSITORY // BOOKTOPIA // DYMOCKS // GOODREADS


Summary:

Welcome, welcome to Caraval―Stephanie Garber’s sweeping tale of two sisters who escape their ruthless father when they enter the dangerous intrigue of a legendary game.

Scarlett has never left the tiny island where she and her beloved sister, Tella, live with their powerful, and cruel, father. Now Scarlett’s father has arranged a marriage for her, and Scarlett thinks her dreams of seeing Caraval, the far-away, once-a-year performance where the audience participates in the show, are over.

But this year, Scarlett’s long-dreamt of invitation finally arrives. With the help of a mysterious sailor, Tella whisks Scarlett away to the show. Only, as soon as they arrive, Tella is kidnapped by Caraval’s mastermind organizer, Legend. It turns out that this season’s Caraval revolves around Tella, and whoever finds her first is the winner.

Scarlett has been told that everything that happens during Caraval is only an elaborate performance. But she nevertheless becomes enmeshed in a game of love, heartbreak, and magic with the other players in the game. And whether Caraval is real or not, she must find Tella before the five nights of the game are over, a dangerous domino effect of consequences is set off, and her sister disappears forever.

(source

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Blog Tour: A Quiet Kind of Thunder Book Review + Q&A With Sara Barnard

A Quiet Kind of ThunderA Quiet Kind of Thunder by Sara Barnard 

Standalone

Genre: YA Contemporary

Publisher: Pan Macmillian Australia


Amazon // Booktopia // Book Depository // Bookworld // Goodreads


Summary:

Steffi doesn’t talk, but she has so much to say.
Rhys can’t hear, but he can listen.
Their love isn’t a lightning strike, it’s the rumbling roll of thunder.

Steffi has been a selective mute for most of her life – she’s been silent for so long that she feels completely invisible. But Rhys, the new boy at school, sees her. He’s deaf, and her knowledge of basic sign language means that she’s assigned to look after him. To Rhys, it doesn’t matter that Steffi doesn’t talk, and as they find ways to communicate, Steffi finds that she does have a voice, and that she’s falling in love with the one person who makes her feel brave enough to use it.

From the bestselling author of Beautiful Broken Things comes a love story about the times when a whisper is as good as a shout.

(source)

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2016 Highlights + 2017 Reading Goals

Proceed with caution:  long-ass, rambly blog post ahead. 

I know I’m probably going to sound like a broken record (because I’m pretty sure every single person on the universe has said this already), but boy, did 2016 fly past. I going to try and refrain myself from making the obligatory dad joke and say that it feels like 2016 was only 2 days ago (ha ha) but in all seriousness, it’s kind of easy to forget how much impact one year can have until you actually sit down and reminisce, or in my case – write a blog post about – the significance it really had. Today, I’m going to be talking about some of my bookish highlights of 2016 plus some of the reading goals that I hope to achieve in 2017.

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Favourite Books of 2016

2016 was a turbulent reading year for me – I read a total of 84 books and there were highs, lows and some new favourites among them. Because I found quite a few new favourites, I thought I would share them with you! These books are not necessarily ones that were released in 2016 (although the large majority of them are) but instead, ones that I read and enjoyed this year. I can pretty easily split up the books I read into categories and so they are the same ones I am going to use to split up my favourites. Now on to the post!

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